Learning Labs

Last updated on
Tuesday, September 11th, 2018
Program Description

Learning Labs are like having the museum as a school for the day. This museum learning program is inquiry based, and staff-led. Museum staff will be working alongside classrooms, investigating big ideas with the galleries as a backdrop. The Learning Lab may include behind the scenes visits in order to deepen an understanding of the role of the museum as a site for research and learning. The times for when classes are at the museum for a Learning Lab are flexible, to align with the needs of the classroom. 

Themes include: Governance and Beyond, Photography and Memory of the Gold Rush, The Numbers of Nature, The Case of the Cougar, Ethics: Dialogue and Debate, Simple Machines, Reading an Object, The Ceremonies and Science of Seasons...and many more. We also offer the option of a Let's Talk Learning Lab, which is customizable to the particular classes we work with.

Big Ideas
  • Confidence develops through the process of self-discovery.
  • Effective collaboration relies on clear, respectful communication.
  • Learning is a lifelong enterprise.
  • New experiences, both within and outside of school, expand our career skill set and options.
  • Our attitudes toward careers are influenced by our view of ourselves as well as by our friends, family, and community.
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs can be improved with prototyping and testing.
  • Skills are developed through practice, effort, and action.
  • Complex tasks may require multiple tools and technologies.
  • Complex tasks require the acquisition of additional skills.
  • Design can be responsive to identified needs.
  • Daily and seasonal changes affect all living things.
  • Humans interact with matter every day through familiar materials.
  • Plants and animals have observable features.
  • Living things have features and behaviours that help them survive in their environment.
  • Living things have life cycles adapted to their environment.
  • Water is essential to all living things, and it cycles through the environment.
  • Living things are diverse, can be grouped, and interact in their ecosystems.
  • All living things sense and respond to their environment.
  • Machines are devices that transfer force and energy.
  • Evolution by natural selection provides an explanation for the diversity and survival of living things.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Everyone has a unique story to share.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
  • Stories and other texts can be shared through pictures and words.
  • Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves and our families.
  • Through listening and speaking, we connect with others and share our world.
  • Using language in creative and playful ways helps us understand how language works.
  • Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens.
  • Texts can be understood from different perspectives.
  • People understand text differently depending on their worldviews and perspectives.
  • Texts are socially, culturally, and historically constructed.
  • Our communities are diverse and made of individuals who have a lot in common.
  • Rights, roles, and responsibilities shape our identity and help us build healthy relationships with others.
  • Stories and traditions about ourselves and our families reflect who we are and where we are from.
  • Healthy communities recognize and respect the diversity of individuals and care for the local environment.
  • We shape the local environment, and the local environment shapes who we are and how we live.
  • Canada is made up of many diverse regions and communities.
  • Individuals have rights and responsibilities as global citizens.
  • Local actions have global consequences, and global actions have local consequences.
  • Indigenous knowledge is passed down through oral history, traditions, and collective memory.
  • Indigenous societies throughout the world value the well-being of the self, the land, spirits, and ancestors.
  • Learning about indigenous peoples nurtures multicultural awareness and respect for diversity.
  • People from diverse cultures and societies share some common experiences and aspects of life.
  • British Columbia followed a unique path in becoming a part of Canada.
  • Demographic changes in North America created shifts in economic and political power.
  • Interactions between First Peoples and Europeans lead to conflict and cooperation, which continues to shape Canada’s identity.
  • The pursuit of valuable natural resources has played a key role in changing the land, people, and communities of Canada.
  • Canada’s policies and treatment of minority peoples have negative and positive legacies.
  • Canadian institutions and government reflect the challenge of our regional diversity.
  • Immigration and multiculturalism continue to shape Canadian society and identity.
  • Natural resources continue to shape the economy and identity of different regions of Canada.
  • Complex global problems require international cooperation to make difficult choices for the future.
  • Economic self-interest can be a significant cause of conflict among peoples and governments.
  • Media sources can both positively and negatively affect our understanding of important events and issues.
  • Systems of government vary in their respect for human rights and freedoms.
  • Economic specialization and trade networks can lead to conflict and cooperation between societies.
  • Geographic conditions shaped the emergence of civilizations.
  • Increasingly complex societies required new systems of laws and government.
  • Religious and cultural practices that emerged during this period have endured and continue to influence people.
  • Changing ideas about the world created tension between people wanting to adopt new ideas and those wanting to preserve established traditions.
  • Contacts and conflicts between peoples stimulated significant cultural, social, political change.
  • Exploration, expansion, and colonization had varying consequences for different groups.
  • Human and environmental factors shape changes in population and living standards.
  • Collective identity is constructed and can change over time.
  • Disparities in power alter the balance of relationships between individuals and between societies.
  • Emerging ideas and ideologies profoundly influence societies and events.
  • The physical environment influences the nature of political, social, and economic change.
  • Trip Details
    City: 
    For Grades: 
    K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
    Months Available: 
    Times Offered: 
    Duration: 
    Half Day minutes unless otherwise stated.
    Maximum Students: 
    Offered In French: 
    Packages Provided: 
    Fee Details
    Fee Notes: 

    Learning Labs are $99 per class. Educators and chaperones are free, up to a certain number depending on the grade level. Contact Chris O'Connor at coconnor@royalbcmuseum.bc.ca for more details.