Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition

Last updated on
Tuesday, September 4th, 2018
Program Description

We invite you and your students to visit Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition and take a trip back in time during June 23, 2018 to January 11, 2019. The galleries in this fascinating exhibition put you inside the Titanic experience like never before. They feature real artifacts recovered from the ocean floor along with room re-creations and personal histories, each highlighting a different chapter in the compelling story of Titanic’s maiden voyage. Board Titanic using a replica White Star Line boarding pass belonging to an actual passenger, touch an iceberg, and learn about artifact recovery and conservation.

Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition is a great catalyst for lessons in science, history, geography, English, math and technology. Many students are familiar with the compelling story behind the Ship’s promised voyage and tragic demise. Innovative educational resources link this innate fascination to classroom friendly lessons that will generate students’ interest before your visit and extend students’ learning beyond the field trip.

Educators Day:
Teachers are welcome to visit the exhibition on June 22, 2018 before it opens to the public. Please show your teacher's badge or pay stub + ID for free admission on June 22. 

Teacher's Guide:
The Exhibition's award-winning Teacher's Guides for elementary school, middle school and high school are available upon request.

Exhibition dates:
June 23, 2018 – January 11, 2019 open daily 10am-6pm. Other special hours can be accommodated upon request.

By public transit:
Lipont Place is right across from the Canada Line Aberdeen Station
https://www.translink.ca/

By School Bus or Car Pool:
School bus parking is on the west side
of the building. $20/three hour.

Parking
230 on-site parking space.

Access
The exhibition is handicap-accessible.

Pricing
$13.95/student (subject to GST)
• Admission to Exhibition + Souvenir Boarding pass
• 1 adult (teacher and/or chaperone) free for every 7 students (general admission only)

→ Audio guides in various languages are available for rent at $5/each.
→ Special hours can be accommodated upon request.
→ For tour, Minimum of 15 students/group, maximum of 30 students/group
→ Due to contractual agreements, there are no other discounts or free passes accepted for this exhibition. Tickets are subject to GST.

Payment
• A deposit of 50% of the total amount due is required upon group tour booking. The deposit must be paid ten business days prior to the field trip. The rest 50% is due upon arrival or upon invoice.
• Cash, check, credit, and debit payments are accepted.Please make cheques payable to YIKON ARTSPACE CO. LTD.

Cancellation Policy:
• If the cancellation is made five business days prior to the scheduled visit, the 50% deposit will be refunded.
• Cancellations made less than five business days prior to the scheduled visit will not be refunded.

Big Ideas
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs can be improved with prototyping and testing.
  • Skills are developed through practice, effort, and action.
  • The choice of technology and tools depends on the task.
  • Designs can be improved with prototyping and testing.
  • Skills are developed through practice, effort, and action.
  • The choice of technology and tools depends on the task.
  • Complex tasks may require multiple tools and technologies.
  • Complex tasks require the acquisition of additional skills.
  • Design can be responsive to identified needs.
  • Complex tasks may require multiple tools and technologies.
  • Complex tasks require the acquisition of additional skills.
  • Design can be responsive to identified needs.
  • Complex tasks may require multiple tools and technologies.
  • Complex tasks require the acquisition of additional skills.
  • Design can be responsive to identified needs.
  • Complex tasks require different technologies and tools at different stages.
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  • Trip Details
    City: 
    For Grades: 
    K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
    Duration: 
    60 minutes unless otherwise stated.
    Maximum Students: 
    Offered In French: 
    Fee Details
    Cost Per Student: 
    $13.95
    Cost Per Adult: 
    $17.95
    Fee Notes: 

    All tickets are subject to GST. Children under five years old get free admission.