Outreach Wednesdays: From the FRDC, to YOU!

Last updated on
Thursday, August 20th, 2020
Experience type: 
Outreach Boxes
Program Description

Can’t come to the Fraser River Discovery Centre? No problem! We can come to you! Two FRDC staff will bring all the materials necessary to run some of our most popular River School Programs right in your own classroom!

All materials will be fully sanitized between use, and the staff will wear masks. If there are additional safety protocols we need to follow, please contact us. Please note, small group work is part of each program, with frequent sanitation of touched objects.

Cost: $7 per student, plus $0.59 per kilometer between FRDC and your school.

When: Wednesdays

Programs:

  • Our Bones are Made of Salmon (Grades 4-7)
    • Indigenous people have relied on salmon since the fish became abundant in the Fraser River about 5000-6000 years ago. This program explores the connection between Indigenous people and salmon on the Fraser River. Students get hands-on experience with fishing technology, learn about wind-drying salmon, and discover that salmon is in the hearts of Indigenous people living along the Fraser River today.
  • Taking the Pulse (Grades 6-9)
    • Follow each step of the scientific method to conduct a water quality investigation. Students observe and become curious about the Fraser River, do background research, construct hypotheses, test their hypotheses by doing experiments, analyze their data, draw a conclusion, and report their results.
  • Living Dinosaurs (Grades K-7)
    • Sturgeon are amazing fish that have been around since the time of the dinosaurs. Human influences over the past 150 years have threatened their existence. In this program, students will learn about the sturgeon lifecycle, survival needs, and what we can do to protect this remarkable species.
  • Trading Trail (Grades 2-5)
    • The Fraser River is one of the world’s great rivers not only in its contribution to the environmental, cultural, and historical wealth of British Columbia, but because of its current pivotal role in the economy of BC. We are going to explore how people have used and shared the resources of the Fraser River, focusing on the tumultuous time when First Nations and Fur traders shared the river.

For more information, visit our website or email us. 

Online booking form here

Big Ideas
  • Development of computational fluency and multiplicative thinking requires analysis of patterns and relations in multiplication and division.
  • Computational fluency and flexibility with numbers extend to operations with larger (multi-digit) numbers.
  • Computational fluency and flexibility with numbers extend to operations with whole numbers and decimals.
  • Computational fluency and flexibility with numbers extend to operations with integers and decimals.
  • Daily and seasonal changes affect all living things.
  • Humans interact with matter every day through familiar materials.
  • Plants and animals have observable features.
  • Living things have features and behaviours that help them survive in their environment.
  • Matter is useful because of its properties.
  • Observable patterns and cycles occur in the local sky and landscape.
  • Living things have life cycles adapted to their environment.
  • Water is essential to all living things, and it cycles through the environment.
  • Living things are diverse, can be grouped, and interact in their ecosystems.
  • Wind, water, and ice change the shape of the land.
  • All living things sense and respond to their environment.
  • Multicellular organisms have organ systems that enable them to survive and interact within their environment.
  • Multicellular organisms rely on internal systems to survive, reproduce, and interact with their environment.
  • Earth and its climate have changed over geological time.
  • Evolution by natural selection provides an explanation for the diversity and survival of living things.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Everyone has a unique story to share.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
  • Stories and other texts can be shared through pictures and words.
  • Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves and our families.
  • Through listening and speaking, we connect with others and share our world.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Everyone has a unique story to share.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
  • Stories and other texts can be shared through pictures and words.
  • Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves and our families.
  • Through listening and speaking, we connect with others and share our world.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Everyone has a unique story to share.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
  • Stories and other texts connect us to ourselves, our families, and our communities.
  • Through listening and speaking, we connect with others and share our world.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves, our families, and our communities.
  • Stories can be understood from different perspectives
  • Using language in creative and playful ways helps us understand how language works.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Exploring and sharing multiple perspectives extends our thinking.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Exploring and sharing multiple perspectives extends our thinking.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Our communities are diverse and made of individuals who have a lot in common.
  • Rights, roles, and responsibilities shape our identity and help us build healthy relationships with others.
  • Stories and traditions about ourselves and our families reflect who we are and where we are from.
  • Healthy communities recognize and respect the diversity of individuals and care for the local environment.
  • Our rights, roles, and responsibilities are important for building strong communities.
  • We shape the local environment, and the local environment shapes who we are and how we live.
  • Canada is made up of many diverse regions and communities.
  • Individuals have rights and responsibilities as global citizens.
  • Local actions have global consequences, and global actions have local consequences.
  • Indigenous knowledge is passed down through oral history, traditions, and collective memory.
  • Indigenous societies throughout the world value the well-being of the self, the land, spirits, and ancestors.
  • Learning about indigenous peoples nurtures multicultural awareness and respect for diversity.
  • People from diverse cultures and societies share some common experiences and aspects of life.
  • British Columbia followed a unique path in becoming a part of Canada.
  • Demographic changes in North America created shifts in economic and political power.
  • Interactions between First Peoples and Europeans lead to conflict and cooperation, which continues to shape Canada’s identity.
  • The pursuit of valuable natural resources has played a key role in changing the land, people, and communities of Canada.
  • Canada’s policies and treatment of minority peoples have negative and positive legacies.
  • Canadian institutions and government reflect the challenge of our regional diversity.
  • Immigration and multiculturalism continue to shape Canadian society and identity.
  • Natural resources continue to shape the economy and identity of different regions of Canada.
  • Complex global problems require international cooperation to make difficult choices for the future.
  • Economic specialization and trade networks can lead to conflict and cooperation between societies.
  • Geographic conditions shaped the emergence of civilizations.
  • COVID Precautions
    All materials will be fully sanitized between use, and the staff will wear masks. If there are additional safety protocols we need to follow, please contact us. Please note, small group work is part of each program, with frequent sanitation of touched objects.
    Trip Details
    Fee Details
    Cost Per Student: 
    $7.00
    Fee Notes: 

    Cost: $7 per student, plus $0.59 per kilometer between FRDC and your school. We encourage bookings from more than one class in a school, so that the classes can split the milage cost. 

    We have an across the board 25% discount on all programs, outreach and kits for inner-city schools.

    Additional Notes

    More than one class can be accommedated throughout the day.