Museum Discovery Tour

Last updated on
Tuesday, May 15th, 2018
Program Description

On this guided tour students uncover the history of social development, crime and law enforcement in Vancouver and how it impacts modern living. Students are guided through a 45-minute tour followed by 15 minutes of self-guided exploration. Tour content and complexity can be tailored to group needs and interests.

Big Ideas
  • Communities include many different roles requiring many different skills.
  • Learning is a lifelong enterprise.
  • Exploring our strengths and abilities can help us identify our goals.
  • Family and community relationships can be a source of support and guidance when solving problems and making decisions.
  • Leadership requires listening to and respecting the ideas of others.
  • New experiences, both within and outside of school, expand our career skill set and options.
  • Practising respectful, ethical, inclusive behaviour prepares us for the expectations of the workplace.
  • Safe environments depend on everyone following safety rules.
  • Adapting to economic and labour market changes requires flexibility.
  • The value of work in our lives, communities, and society can be viewed from diverse perspectives.
  • Skills are developed through practice, effort, and action.
  • The choice of technology and tools depends on the task.
  • Complex tasks may require multiple tools and technologies.
  • Complex tasks require the acquisition of additional skills.
  • Design can be responsive to identified needs.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
  • Through listening and speaking, we connect with others and share our world.
  • Using language in creative and playful ways helps us understand how language works.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens.
  • Exploring and sharing multiple perspectives extends our thinking.
  • Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • People understand text differently depending on their worldviews and perspectives.
  • Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens.
  • Texts are socially, culturally, and historically constructed.
  • Learning about ourselves and others helps us develop a positive attitude and caring behaviours, which helps us build healthy relationships.
  • Learning about ourselves and others helps us develop a positive attitude and caring behaviours, which helps us build healthy relationships.
  • Personal choices and social and environmental factors influence our health and well-being.
  • Personal choices and social and environmental factors influence our health and well-being.
  • Daily physical activity enables us to practice skillful movement and helps us develop personal fitness.
  • Learning about similarities and differences in individuals and groups influences community health.
  • Physical literacy and fitness contribute to our success in and enjoyment of physical activity.
  • Lifelong participation in physical activity has many benefits and is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle.
  • Our communities are diverse and made of individuals who have a lot in common.
  • Rights, roles, and responsibilities shape our identity and help us build healthy relationships with others.
  • Stories and traditions about ourselves and our families reflect who we are and where we are from.
  • Healthy communities recognize and respect the diversity of individuals and care for the local environment.
  • Our rights, roles, and responsibilities are important for building strong communities.
  • We shape the local environment, and the local environment shapes who we are and how we live.
  • Canada is made up of many diverse regions and communities.
  • Individuals have rights and responsibilities as global citizens.
  • Local actions have global consequences, and global actions have local consequences.
  • People from diverse cultures and societies share some common experiences and aspects of life.
  • British Columbia followed a unique path in becoming a part of Canada.
  • Demographic changes in North America created shifts in economic and political power.
  • Interactions between First Peoples and Europeans lead to conflict and cooperation, which continues to shape Canada’s identity.
  • The pursuit of valuable natural resources has played a key role in changing the land, people, and communities of Canada.
  • Canada’s policies and treatment of minority peoples have negative and positive legacies.
  • Canadian institutions and government reflect the challenge of our regional diversity.
  • Immigration and multiculturalism continue to shape Canadian society and identity.
  • Natural resources continue to shape the economy and identity of different regions of Canada.
  • Economic self-interest can be a significant cause of conflict among peoples and governments.
  • Media sources can both positively and negatively affect our understanding of important events and issues.
  • Systems of government vary in their respect for human rights and freedoms.
  • Economic specialization and trade networks can lead to conflict and cooperation between societies.
  • Increasingly complex societies required new systems of laws and government.
  • Changing ideas about the world created tension between people wanting to adopt new ideas and those wanting to preserve established traditions.
  • Contacts and conflicts between peoples stimulated significant cultural, social, political change.
  • Exploration, expansion, and colonization had varying consequences for different groups.
  • Human and environmental factors shape changes in population and living standards.
  • Collective identity is constructed and can change over time.
  • Disparities in power alter the balance of relationships between individuals and between societies.
  • Emerging ideas and ideologies profoundly influence societies and events.
  • The physical environment influences the nature of political, social, and economic change.
  • Trip Details
    City: 
    For Grades: 
    K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, Teachers Only
    Duration: 
    60 minutes unless otherwise stated.
    Maximum Students: 
    Offered In French: 
    Also Offered For: 
    Packages Provided: 
    Fee Details
    Cost Per Student: 
    $5.50
    Cost Per Adult: 
    $0.00
    Additional Notes

    A Scavenger Hunt option is available for this program. Please contact the Curator of Learning for this option.