Online Resources

Last updated on
Tuesday, September 1st, 2020
Experience type: 
Online Resource
Program Description

BC Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation (BCAITC) offers a multitude of free downloadable agriculture and food resources for K-12 students. The lesson plans, unit plans, activities, recipes, storybooks, videos, and educational resources feature curriculum-connections to Sustainable Agriculture, Science, Social Studies, Math, English Language Arts, Arts, Food Studies and more. Teachers, at-home educators, and students can download the resources here 24/7. These resources introduce food and agriculture education into students' lives to encourage appreciation of agriculture, food, and healthy eating for years to come!

Big Ideas
  • New experiences, both within and outside of school, expand our career skill set and options.
  • New experiences, both within and outside of school, expand our career skill set and options.
  • Adapting to economic and labour market changes requires flexibility.
  • Our career paths reflect the personal, community, and educational choices we make.
  • Reflecting on our preferences and skills helps us identify the steps we need to take to achieve our career goals.
  • Adapting to economic and labour market changes requires flexibility.
  • Our career paths reflect the personal, community, and educational choices we make.
  • Reflecting on our preferences and skills helps us identify the steps we need to take to achieve our career goals.
  • Effective career planning considers both internal and external factors.
  • Learning how to learn prepares us to be lifelong learners who can adapt to changing career opportunities.
  • Successful career and education paths require planning, evaluating, and adapting.
  • The global economy affects our personal, social, and economic lives and prospects.
  • Effective career planning considers both internal and external factors.
  • Learning how to learn prepares us to be lifelong learners who can adapt to changing career opportunities.
  • Successful career and education paths require planning, evaluating, and adapting.
  • The global economy affects our personal, social, and economic lives and prospects.
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs grow out of natural curiosity.
  • Skills can be developed through play.
  • Technologies are tools that extend human capabilities.
  • Designs can be improved with prototyping and testing.
  • Skills are developed through practice, effort, and action.
  • The choice of technology and tools depends on the task.
  • Designs can be improved with prototyping and testing.
  • Skills are developed through practice, effort, and action.
  • The choice of technology and tools depends on the task.
  • Complex tasks may require multiple tools and technologies.
  • Complex tasks require the acquisition of additional skills.
  • Design can be responsive to identified needs.
  • Complex tasks may require multiple tools and technologies.
  • Complex tasks require the acquisition of additional skills.
  • Design can be responsive to identified needs.
  • Complex tasks may require multiple tools and technologies.
  • Complex tasks require the acquisition of additional skills.
  • Design can be responsive to identified needs.
  • Complex tasks require different technologies and tools at different stages.
  • Complex tasks require the sequencing of skills.
  • Social, ethical, and sustainability considerations impact design.
  • Familiar events can be described as likely or unlikely and compared.
  • Numbers represent quantities that can be decomposed into smaller parts.
  • Objects have attributes that can be described, measured, and compared.
  • Repeating elements in patterns can be identified.
  • Objects and shapes have attributes that can be described, measured, and compared.
  • Repeating elements in patterns can be identified.
  • Concrete items can be represented, compared, and interpreted pictorially in graphs.
  • Objects and shapes have attributes that can be described, measured, and compared.
  • The regular change in increasing patterns can be identified and used to make generalizations.
  • Development of computational fluency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers requires flexible decomposing and composing.
  • Regular increases and decreases in patterns can be identified and used to make generalizations.
  • The likelihood of possible outcomes can be examined, compared, and interpreted.
  • Development of computational fluency and multiplicative thinking requires analysis of patterns and relations in multiplication and division.
  • Regular changes in patterns can be identified and represented using tools and tables.
  • Data represented in graphs can be used to show many-to-one correspondence.
  • Identified regularities in number patterns can be expressed in tables.
  • Numbers describe quantities that can be represented by equivalent fractions.
  • Data from the results of an experiment can be used to predict the theoretical probability of an event and to compare and interpret.
  • Linear relations can be identified and represented using expressions with variables and line graphs and can be used to form generalizations.
  • Properties of objects and shapes can be described, measured, and compared using volume, area, perimeter, and angles.
  • Data from circle graphs can be used to illustrate proportion and to compare and interpret.
  • Linear relations can be represented in many connected ways to identify regularities and make generalizations.
  • Analyzing data by determining averages is one way to make sense of large data sets and enables us to compare and interpret.
  • Number represents, describes, and compares the quantities of ratios, rates, and percents.
  • Analyzing the validity, reliability, and representation of data enables us to compare and interpret.
  • Daily and seasonal changes affect all living things.
  • Humans interact with matter every day through familiar materials.
  • Plants and animals have observable features.
  • Light and sound can be produced and their properties can be changed.
  • Living things have features and behaviours that help them survive in their environment.
  • Observable patterns and cycles occur in the local sky and landscape.
  • Living things have life cycles adapted to their environment.
  • Materials can be changed through physical and chemical processes.
  • Water is essential to all living things, and it cycles through the environment.
  • Living things are diverse, can be grouped, and interact in their ecosystems.
  • Thermal energy can be produced and transferred.
  • Wind, water, and ice change the shape of the land.
  • All living things sense and respond to their environment.
  • Energy can be transformed.
  • Multicellular organisms have organ systems that enable them to survive and interact within their environment.
  • Solutions are homogeneous.
  • Everyday materials are often mixtures.
  • Multicellular organisms rely on internal systems to survive, reproduce, and interact with their environment.
  • Earth and its climate have changed over geological time.
  • Life processes are performed at the cellular level.
  • Cells are derived from cells.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
  • Stories and other texts can be shared through pictures and words.
  • Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves and our families.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
  • Stories and other texts can be shared through pictures and words.
  • Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves and our families.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
  • Stories and other texts connect us to ourselves, our families, and our communities.
  • Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves, our families, and our communities.
  • Stories can be understood from different perspectives
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Exploring and sharing multiple perspectives extends our thinking.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Developing our understanding of how language works allows us to use it purposefully.
  • Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
  • Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
  • Knowing about our bodies and making healthy choices helps us look after ourselves.
  • Knowing about our bodies and making healthy choices helps us look after ourselves.
  • Adopting healthy personal practices and safety strategies protects ourselves and others.
  • Adopting healthy personal practices and safety strategies protects ourselves and others.
  • Personal choices and social and environmental factors influence our health and well-being.
  • Understanding ourselves and the various aspects of health helps us develop a balanced lifestyle.
  • Personal choices and social and environmental factors influence our health and well-being.
  • Understanding ourselves and the various aspects of health helps us develop a balanced lifestyle.
  • Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.
  • Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.
  • Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.
  • Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.
  • Our communities are diverse and made of individuals who have a lot in common.
  • Rights, roles, and responsibilities shape our identity and help us build healthy relationships with others.
  • Stories and traditions about ourselves and our families reflect who we are and where we are from.
  • Healthy communities recognize and respect the diversity of individuals and care for the local environment.
  • Our rights, roles, and responsibilities are important for building strong communities.
  • We shape the local environment, and the local environment shapes who we are and how we live.
  • Canada is made up of many diverse regions and communities.
  • Individuals have rights and responsibilities as global citizens.
  • Local actions have global consequences, and global actions have local consequences.
  • Indigenous societies throughout the world value the well-being of the self, the land, spirits, and ancestors.
  • Learning about indigenous peoples nurtures multicultural awareness and respect for diversity.
  • Natural resources continue to shape the economy and identity of different regions of Canada.
  • Trip Details
    City: 
    For Grades: 
    K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, Teachers Only
    Duration: 
    See notes. minutes unless otherwise stated.
    Maximum Students: 
    Offered In French: 
    Also Offered For: 
    Additional Notes

    Download BCAITC's free resources from https://www.bcaitc.ca/resources from anywhere, anytime!